Joanne Hynes

Joanne Hynes is a fashion designer, design consultant, stylist, businesswoman and mother, who approaches all creative and business projects with an experimental and intellectually creative vision. Her passion and experience over the past 15 years with craft driven design techniques has developed into a globally stocked signature clothing and accessories range including collaborations with Topshop and Pretty Polly worldwide. The Joanne Hynes Studio collaborates across all platforms from private client projects, celebrity dressing and styling, alongside various collaborative and commissioned fashion.

www.joannehynes.com

Second Skin Collaborators:
Knitwear Manufacturer: Fisherman Out of Ireland; Des Daly, Seamus Doherty, 3D Model Maker & Designer: Dave Head

Joanne Hynes

 

Inspiration

“It was important for us as a brand to work with a product that has deep-seated Irish roots and commercial potential, Donegal's Fisherman Out of Ireland represented both for us. The focus for us was to bring an aspirational approach to the knitwear pieces in particular through the use of colour and design. I also needed technological innovation in the mix. This is where working with 3D Printing provided a new innovative approach to manufacturing and design for us.”

I chose to work with Fisherman Out of Ireland who are based in Donegal and Dave Head 3D Printing based in Dublin. I am deeply interested in the nature of craft processes, including modernity and innovation within technology and chose to work with both parties due to their disparate product differences, unique boundaries and capabilities. It was important for us as a brand to design a product that has deep seated commercial potential and to bring an aspirational approach to that product through the use of colour and design. Donegal's Fisherman Out of Ireland have a very particular laid back textural approach with muted colours, this inspired us to design the complete polar opposite to their own signature and making it Joanne Hynes in essence. The innovation around 3D printing is very exotic and exciting, keeping the focus once again on brilliant colours, unique form and decorative functions.

 

Process

“I am deeply interested in craft, modernity and innovation within technology, design and manufacturing. The innovation around knitwear and 3D printing is very exotic and exciting and both processes are very different which was refreshing.”

I chose to work with Fisherman Out of Ireland who are based in Donegal and Dave Head 3d Printing in Dublin. I am deeply interested in both craft (namely knitwear as a product) and also modernity and innovation within technology and chose to work with both parties due to their disparate product differences and feel. It was important for us as a brand to work with a product that has deep seated commercial potential and to bring an aspirational approach to the product through the use of colour and design. Donegal's Fisherman Out of Ireland have a very particular laid back textural approach with muted colours, this allowed me to design the complete polar opposite to their own signature and making it Joanne Hynes in essence. The innovation around 3D printing is very exotic and exciting but I deliberately worked with a gentle product (brooches) which are wearable and functional-unlike quite a lot of the 3D pieces out there. I stayed away from anything too un-practical, keeping the focus on again, brilliant colours, unique form and decorative function.

From an ethical standpoint, local producing saves on transport and couriers and all of the obvious problems associated with outsourcing abroad. The lambswool came from the UK as there were no options available to us in Ireland within such small quantities and colours and at short notice. 3D colours were unlimited but shape had to be carefully considered.

Working with local production partners allows immediate answers to questions, quicker turnaround of ideas, allowing us to get to the finished prototype much sooner.

Production was challenging in that it had a narrow offer-due to time and quantity we could only work with one yarn and one finish but I was more than happy to work in this manner. The knit machines and the 3D printer, allowed a certain look and feel so we worked within these parameters for all four pieces. From a production viewpoint the limitations became the guide to my designs.

Price wise we are relatively on par with other countries for the sampling costs, although working abroad would be 30-40% cheaper in the difference due to lower labour costs per hour. The price issue is clearer once one looks at the quantities in the case of an order for a store, that is when a price can be negotiated and the order volume would have an impact on the price shift, usually the higher the volume the price shifts downwards. Sampling can work out to be more costly in Ireland due to the overheads within the business overall and the costs. I feel the price is higher in relation to other countries, bearing in mind the weight of the garments, they are heavy weight and knit yarn is based on the weight per kg.

Official photography by Rich Gilligan, production photography by Evelyn McNamara, 3D printing photograph by Dave Head